GCP Student Living Plc (DIGS.L) presently has a 6 month price index of 1.119395. The price index is calculated by dividing the current share price by the share price six months ago. A ratio over one indicates an increase in share price over the period. A ratio lower than one shows that the price has decreased over that time period. Looking at some alternate time periods, the 12 month price index is 1.19859 and the five year is 1.862791. Narrowing in a bit closer, the 3 month is 1.083032, and the 1 month is currently 1.047059.

Investors are constantly looking for ways to find success in the stock market. Figuring out what stocks to buy can be tough. With so many different names to choose from, the task can seem quite overwhelming at times. Many investors will opt to go with a mix of growth and value stocks. Investors looking to capitalize on shorter-term price movements may have a completely different game plan than those who are looking to fin stocks to hold onto for the longer-term. Finding quality stocks that match the individual’s criteria may take a lot of effort and dedication, but it may be well worth it for the long-term success of the portfolio.      

Value Composite Three (VC3) is another adaptation of O’Shaughnessy’s value composite but here he combines the factors used in VC1 with buyback yield. This factor is interesting for investors who’re looking for stocks with the best value characteristics, but are indifferent to whether these companies pay a dividend.

VC3 is the combination of the following factors:

Price-to-Book
Price-to-Earnings
Price-to-Sales
EBITDA/EV
Price-to-Cash flow
Buyback Yield

As with the VC1 and VC2, companies are put into groups from 1 to 100 for each ratio and the individual scores are summed up. This total score is then put into groups again from 1 to 100. 1 is cheap, 100 is expensive.

The scorecard also displays variants of the VC3 where the score is calculated for the selected company compared to peer companies in the same industry, industry group or sector.

Please note that we use Book-to-Market instead of P/B since it allows a more accurate sorting compared to P/B. Stocks with a high B/M show up at the top of the list, stocks with negative B/M are at the bottom of the list. For the same reason we use Earnings-to-Price instead of Price-to-Earnings and Cash flow-to-price instead instead of Price-to-cash flow.

Also important is that we always make sure that companies with the same score get added to the same percentile. For stock universes where the number of stocks is less than 100, we make sure that the stocks are still allocated to percentiles from 0 to 100 instead of 0 to the total number of stocks. This is particularly relevant for the industry, industry group or sector variants where if additional filters are used, the number of stocks often drops below 100.

GCP Student Living Plc (DIGS.L) has a VC3 of 40.

Free Cash Flow Growth (FCF Growth) is the free cash flow of the current year minus the free cash flow from the previous year, divided by last year’s free cash flow. The FCF Yield of GCP Student Living Plc (DIGS.L) is 0.02605. Free cash flow (FCF) is the cash produced by the company minus capital expenditure. This cash is what a company uses to meet its financial obligations, such as making payments on debt or to pay out dividends. The 5 Year FCF Yield of GCP Student Living Plc (DIGS.L) is 0.011802. Experts say the higher the value, the better, as it means that the free cash flow is high, or the variability of free cash flow is low or both.

Gross Margin

Robert Novy-Marx, a professor at the university of Rochester, discovered that gross profitability – a quality factor – has as much power predicting stock returns as traditional value metrics. He found that while other quality measures had some predictive power, especially on small caps and in conjunction with value measures, gross profitability generates significant excess returns as a stand alone strategy, especially on large cap stocks.

Market watchers may also be following some quality ratios for GCP Student Living Plc (DIGS.L). Robert Novy-Marx, a professor at the university of Rochester, discovered that gross profitability – a quality factor – has as much power predicting stock returns as traditional value metrics. He found that while other quality measures had some predictive power, especially on small caps and in conjunction with value measures, gross profitability generates significant excess returns as a stand alone strategy, especially on large cap stocks.The Gross profitability for (DIGS.L) is 0.028297.

Altman Z

GCP Student Living Plc (DIGS.L) currently has an Altman Z score of 2.707642. The Z-Score for predicting bankruptcy was published in 1968 by Edward I. Altman, who was assistant professor of finance at New York University at that time. It measures the financial health of a company based on a set of income and balance sheet values. The Altman Z-Score predicts the probability that a firm will go bankrupt within 2 years. In its initial test, the Altman Z-Score was found to be 72% accurate in predicting bankruptcy two years before the event. In a series of subsequent tests, the model was found to be approximately 80%–90% accurate in predicting bankruptcy one year before the event.

At the time of writing, GCP Student Living Plc (DIGS.L) has a Piotroski F-Score of 3. The F-Score may help discover companies with strengthening balance sheets. The score may also be used to spot the weak performers. Joseph Piotroski developed the F-Score which employs nine different variables based on the company financial statement. A single point is assigned to each test that a stock passes. Typically, a stock scoring an 8 or 9 would be seen as strong. On the other end, a stock with a score from 0-2 would be viewed as weak.

New traders may face many challenges when entering the stock market. One of the bigger challenges involves not repeating mistakes. As with any new endeavor, there will be a learning curve. Paying attention to historical trades can help the trader figure out where they might have gone astray. Repeating the same mistakes over and over again can lead to the demise of the trader’s confidence and hard earned money. Traders who are able to move forward and learn from previous errors may find themselves making much better decisions in the future.